Spaghetti Sauce for Canning Made with Fresh Tomatoes

Slow cooked and loaded with flavor, this homemade canning spaghetti sauce is a great way to preserve the harvest. Never buy sauce from the store again.
A good recipe for spaghetti sauce for canning is a must in our house, because many commercial sauces use ingredients like genetically modified high fructose corn syrup and soybean oil – not things we normally eat. My favorite recipe is adapted from The Encyclopedia of Country Living by Carla Emery. My husband came in from outside the first time I made this spaghetti sauce, smiled and said the house smelled like an Italian restaurant – a good Italian restaurant. I had to agree. It takes a while to cook, but the end result is delicious! I start a batch in the morning, and slow cook while I’m working on other things in the kitchen, like prepping the rest of the ingredients and canning equipment. Paste tomatoes will yield a thicker sauce with less cooking, but you can use any tomatoes that you have available.

NOTE: You do need to use a pressure canner for this recipe, since it contains low acid ingredients like oil. It is not safe to increase the proportion of onions, peppers, celery or mushrooms in this recipe if you are planning to can the sauce. This will change the acidity of the product and increase the potential for spoilage. See The Natural Canning Resource Book for a full explanation of safe canning practices.

Spaghetti Sauce for Canning Recipe with Fresh Tomatoes

Ingredients

  • 30 pounds tomatoes
  • 1/4 cup butter or olive oil
  • 1 cup chopped onions
  • 5 minced garlic cloves
  • 1 cup chopped celery or green pepper (I used celery)
  • 1 pound sliced mushrooms (optional)
  • 2 tablespoons salt
  • 2 teaspoons black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons oregano (flakes, not powder)
  • 1/4 cup minced parsley
  • 1/4 cup brown sugar or unrefined cane sugar (rapadura or sucanat)

Wash 30 pounds of tomatoes. Remove cores and quarter tomatoes. Cook 20 minutes, uncovered, in large pan or pans to soften tomatoes. I cook mine at a strong simmer in an assortment of heavy bottom stainless steel pans. I have also used a Nesco roaster. Thick bottom pans prevent accidental scorching, frequent stirring is recommended. Don’t use aluminum, folks, it will react with the acid in the tomatoes. When I cook on the stove top, I start with four pans and cook the sauce down to one 8 quart stockpot.

Slow cooked and loaded with flavor, this homemade canning spaghetti sauce is a great way to preserve the harvest. Never buy sauce from the store again.

Put tomatoes through a food strainer or food mill. I have a Back to Basics food strainer that works beautifully. Years ago I used a chinoise strainer, and I still use it for small batches, but for large batches the food strainer can’t be beat. It’s so much faster!

Slow cooked and loaded with flavor, this homemade canning spaghetti sauce is a great way to preserve the harvest. Never buy sauce from the store again.

Cook down tomatoes to reduce volume and make a thicker sauce. We start with four pots and end up with one.

Slow cooked and loaded with flavor, this homemade canning spaghetti sauce is a great way to preserve the harvest. Never buy sauce from the store again.

While the sauce is cooking, you can do the rest of the prep work, like chopping the rest of your veggies, filling the canner, and getting the lids and jars ready.

My pressure canner uses three quarts of water, to which I add one tablespoon of white vinegar to reduce hard water build up on the jars. I wash my jars in the dishwasher and keep them hot until I’m ready to fill. I keep my lids in hot water in a one quart saucepan (do not boil lids), and use kitchen tongs for lifting them out of the water. The latest generation of canning lids from Ball do not require preheating, but I have a stock of lids that I am still working through.

To Finish the Sauce

Saute in 1/4 cup butter or olive oil until tender: onions, garlic, celery or green pepper, and mushrooms. Combine sauteed vegetables and tomatoes. Add salt, black pepper, oregano, parsley and sugar.

Bring to a boil. Stir frequently to avoid burning. Reduce heat to simmer, keep hot while waiting to process.

Fill jars, leaving 1 inch headspace. Adjust lids. Process in a pressure canner 20 minutes for pints, 25 minutes for quarts.

If using a weighted-gauge canner, set at 10 pounds pressure at 0-1,000 feet above sea level; set at 15 pounds pressure at higher altitudes. If using a dial-gauge canner; set at 11 pounds pressure at 0-2000 feet above sea level; 12 pounds at 2,001-4,000 feet; 13 pounds at 4,001-6,000 feet; 14 pounds at 6.001-8,000 feet; or 15 pounds above 8,000 feet.

Yields around eight pints.

Our latest of canning yielded eight pints of spaghetti sauce, 14 pints of salsa, three pints of stewed tomatoes and 5 pints of tomato juice. (I drained some juice off the tomatoes before making them into salsa and sauce by putting them in a strainer after they were cut into pieces.)

Slow cooked and loaded with flavor, this homemade canning spaghetti sauce is a great way to preserve the harvest. Never buy sauce from the store again.

If You Don’t Have Enough Ripe Tomatoes from One Picking

If you don’t have enough ripe at one time, you can pop ones that are very ripe or damaged into the freezer until you have enough for the recipe.

I usually core the tomatoes and half or quarter them (depending on the size) before freezing. Then, when I am planning to can the next day, I place them in the sink overnight to thaw. In the morning, you can pour off some of the clear juice if you like so that the cook down quicker. Weigh them out, dump them into your stockpot, and start cooking.

I have found that ripe, undamaged tomatoes will easily keep for a week or more at room temperature. Cracked or otherwise damaged tomatoes will only last a day or two before spoiling and/or attracting fruit flies, so they should be processed in some manner within 24 hours if possible.

Home Canned Spaghetti Sauce 2014-09-19 09:01:53 Yields 8 Slow cooked and loaded with flavor, this homemade spaghetti sauce for canning is a great way to preserve your garden bounty.

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414 calories
79 g
15 g
9 g
17 g
4 g
1815 g
1872 g
54 g
0 g
4 g

Nutrition Facts

Serving Size
1815g

Yields
8
Amount Per Serving

Calories 414
Calories from Fat 82

% Daily Value *

Total Fat 9g
15%

Saturated Fat 4g
21%

Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 2g
Monounsaturated Fat 2g

Cholesterol 15mg
5%

Sodium 1872mg
78%

Total Carbohydrates 79g
26%

Dietary Fiber 22g
89%

Sugars 54g
Protein 17g

Vitamin A292%Vitamin C399%
Calcium22%Iron32%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

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Ingredients

  1. 30 pounds tomatoes
  2. 1/4 cup butter or olive oil
  3. 1 cup chopped onions
  4. 5 minced garlic cloves
  5. 1 cup chopped celery or green pepper
  6. 1 pound sliced mushrooms (optional)
  7. 2 tablespoons salt
  8. 2 teaspoons black pepper
  9. 2 tablespoons dried oregano (flakes, not powder)
  10. 1/4 cup minced parsley
  11. 1/4 cup brown sugar or unrefined cane sugar

Instructions

  1. Wash 30 pounds of tomatoes. Remove cores and quarter tomatoes. Boil 20 minutes, uncovered, in large pan (or pans).
  2. Put through food strainer or food mill. Cook down tomatoes to reduce volume and make a thicker sauce. Reduce volume by 1/2 to 2/3rds.
  3. While the sauce is cooking, you can do the rest of the prep work, like chopping the rest of your veggies and getting the lids and jars ready. Prepare pressure canner according to manufacturer's instructions.

To Finish the Sauce

  1. Saute in 1/4 cup butter or olive oil until tender: onions, garlic, celery or green pepper, and mushrooms.
  2. Combine sauteed vegetables and tomatoes.
  3. Add salt, black pepper, oregano, parsley and sugar.
  4. Bring to a boil. Stir frequently to avoid burning. Reduce heat to simmer, keep hot while waiting to process.
  5. Fill jars, leaving 1 inch headspace. Adjust lids.
  6. Process in a pressure canner 20 minutes for pints, 25 minutes for quarts. If using a weighted-gauge canner, set at 10 pounds pressure at 0-1,000 feet above sea level; set at 15 pounds pressure at higher altitudes. If using a dial-gauge canner; set at 11 pounds pressure at 0-2000 feet above sea level; 12 pounds at 2,001-4,000 feet; 13 pounds at 4,001-6,000 feet; 14 pounds at 6.001-8,000 feet; or 15 pounds above 8,000 feet.

Notes

  1. It is not safe to increase the proportion of onions, peppers, celery or mushrooms in this recipe if you are planning to can the sauce. (This will change the acidity of the product and increase the potential for spoilage. See The Natural Canning Resource Book for a full explanation of safe canning practices.)

Adapted from The Encyclopedia of Country Living
beta

calories
414

fat
9g

protein
17g

carbs
79g

more

Adapted from The Encyclopedia of Country Living
Common Sense Homesteading http://commonsensehome.com/
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Slow cooked and loaded with flavor, this homemade canning spaghetti sauce is a great way to preserve the harvest. Never buy sauce from the store again.

<br />Originally published in 2009, updated May 2016.

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