No Can Dill Pickles – Just Stick Them in a Jar!

It doesn't get any easier than Betty's no can dill pickles. Just pack them in a jar, cover with brine, and in 3 days you have crunchy, delicious pickles.

My early attempts at dill pickles were not very successful. I followed the FDA guidelines from the Ball Blue Book of Preserving, and ended up with tasty pickles with absolutely no crunch. I love my Blue Book, but these were not the pickles I was looking for. As I understand it, many commercial manufacturers add alum (basically aluminum) to give their pickles crunch. Needless to say, I wasn’t going that direction. These no can dill pickles bring the crunch without the aluminum.

This recipe is from my neighbor Betty. Betty and I have swapped a lot of produce and recipes over the years (she’s also my son’s piano teacher and has become like a grandmother to him ? ). Betty makes a simple old-fashioned brined dill pickle that doesn’t require canning, and couldn’t be easier to make.

Betty’s No Can Dill Pickles

Ingredients

  • 9 cups water
  • 1 ½ cup vinegar
  • 1/3 cup salt (Do not use salt with iodine, it will give the pickles a brown tint, Real Salt also gives a slight brown tint, canning salt works best)
  • ½ cup sugar
  • Dill, 2-3 stalks
  • 2-4 inch long cucumbers, enough to fill a gallon jar

Directions

Combine the water, vinegar, salt and sugar and boil one minute. Cool slightly.

Wash the cucumbers and cut off about 1/16”from each end. This gets rid of some enzymes that would soften the pickles, and allows better penetration of the brine. Pack the cucumbers in a one gallon jar with the dill.

It doesn't get any easier than Betty's no can dill pickles. Just pack them in a jar, cover with brine, and in 3 days you have crunchy, delicious pickles.

Note: I like to curl up some of the dill in the top of the jar to pin down the cucumbers and make sure they all stay submerged in the brine.

It doesn't get any easier than Betty's no can dill pickles. Just pack them in a jar, cover with brine, and in 3 days you have crunchy, delicious pickles.

Pour the warm brine over the cucumbers. Let stand, loosely covered, at room temperature for three days. (Drape a towel over the jar opening or let lid sit on loosely.) I rubber band everything, especially in fruit fly season. You could also use something like the Picklemeister Glass Fermentor Jar, which in addition to being fun to say, comes with its own airlock built right into the lid.

Cover and store in refrigerator. They are ready to eat after the three days but the flavor improves after a week or two in the refrigerator.

That’s it! No canning, no heat processing of any sort. These pickles stay fresh and crisp tasty for months. We’ve enjoyed them at Christmastime. If you don’t have a lot of small cucumbers, you could cut the recipe in half, or make up a full batch of brine but process pickles by the quart and hold the reserve brine in the fridge for a couple of weeks. Delicious! Thanks, Betty. I love my country neighbors!

Easiest Ever, No Canning Required Dill Pickles 2014-08-29 10:01:45 Yields 1 Super easy no-canning required dill pickles. No canning required, store in the fridge for months.

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Prep Time
15 min

Prep Time
15 min

795 calories
183 g
0 g
3 g
15 g
1 g
4981 g
37864 g
138 g
0 g
1 g

Nutrition Facts

Serving Size
4981g

Yields
1
Amount Per Serving

Calories 795
Calories from Fat 21

% Daily Value *

Total Fat 3g
4%

Saturated Fat 1g
4%

Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 1g
Monounsaturated Fat 0g

Cholesterol 0mg
0%

Sodium 37864mg
1578%

Total Carbohydrates 183g
61%

Dietary Fiber 11g
46%

Sugars 138g
Protein 15g

Vitamin A48%Vitamin C107%
Calcium48%Iron38%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

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Ingredients

  1. 9 cups water
  2. 1 ½ cup vinegar
  3. 1/3 cup canning salt
  4. ½ cup sugar
  5. Dill, 2-3 stalks
  6. 2-4 inch long cucumbers, enough to fill a gallon jar

Instructions

  1. Combine the water, vinegar, salt and sugar and boil one minute. Cool slightly.
  2. Wash the cucumbers and cut off about 1/16”from each end. This gets rid of some enzymes that would soften the pickles, and allows better penetration of the brine. Pack the cucumbers in a one gallon jar with the dill.
  3. Pour the warm brine over the cucumbers. Let stand, loosely covered, at room temperature for three days. (Drape a towel over the jar opening or let lid sit on loosely.) I rubber band everything, especially in fruit fly season.
  4. Cover and store in refrigerator. They are ready to eat after the three days but the flavor improves after a week or two in the refrigerator.

Notes

  1. I like to curl up some of the dill in the top of the jar to pin down the cucumbers and make sure they all stay submerged in the brine.

By Betty Schleis
beta

calories
795

fat
3g

protein
15g

carbs
183g

more

Common Sense Homesteading http://commonsensehome.com/

It doesn't get any easier than Betty's no can dill pickles. Just pack them in a jar, cover with brine, and in 3 days you have crunchy, delicious pickles.

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Originally published in 2010, updated 2016.
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